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Dana 44 ABS hubs...

silvrzuki77

Well-Known Member
Messages
556
Location
Vegas
Yeah I assumed smaller tube and 3.somethibg gearing. Is your link kit going to be running coils or coilovers? Looking forward to seeing a prototype on that!!! Hopefully longer arms versus copying somewhat of a jeep setup. I 3 linked my old samurai and it worked awesome.
 

4speedfunk

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,156
Location
Tardville
Is your link kit going to be running coils or coilovers?
This will be a coil-spring kit. However the difference between a coil/shock arrangement and a coil-over would be very minor....literally just replace the spring pads with shock-mounts. The links and mounting points would be the same for either type.

Hopefully longer arms versus copying somewhat of a jeep setup.
Nope...its actually very close to a Jeep setup. The problem with the Jeep suspension, occurs after you lift it. You end up using 40% of the "articulation range" just to achieve static ride-height. So when they droop...everything swings way outta whack. I've seen some short-arm XJs running 5" of lift using stock lower mounts, and the angle looks horrible! I'm sure the road manners are pretty harsh too. For this reason the long-arm is the way to go on a 5"+ Jeep because you have to compensate for starting at 40% of your suspension design. Now go crawl under a stock Jeep and look at the angles. They're actually ideal! That's what I was shooting for.

My links are actually quite short. Even though I'm using short arms...the lower link angles are very mild (nearly flat). The upper link is actually running uphill when the vehicle is at rest...sort of tucked-up high beside the oil pan. So even with 6" of lift over stock...the suspension is sitting relatively low in its range of movement...0% (like a stock Jeep). Essentially, on the H3 you're building your suspension with the 6" of lift already accounted for. This is a huge advantage over a short-arm Jeep where you use up 40% of your suspension just to obtain static lift. That creates all kinds of problems (and the need for longer arms).

On a solid axle H3 things are tad different. Because you're building it from scratch...you don't need to waste a bunch of your "articulation range" just to get lift. You simply build the suspension so it starts its cycle with 6" of lift...at 0% (not 40%). Because of the mild angles...long arms are not really needed. Also...its drives, handles, and reacts like it should. Even the track bar angle is very mild, which means there is almost no bump-steer at all. Its very much a Jeep setup...A STOCK ONE!
 
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06 H3

a.k.a. "The Jackal"
Messages
9,177
Location
Santa Clarita, Ca
Nope...its actually very close to a Jeep setup. The problem with the Jeep suspension, occurs after you lift it. You end up using 40% of the "articulation range" just to achieve static ride-height. So when they droop...everything swings way outta whack. I've seen some short-arm XJs running 5" of lift using stock lower mounts, and the angle looks horrible! I'm sure the road manners are pretty harsh too. For this reason the long-arm is the way to go on a 5"+ Jeep because you have to compensate for starting at 40% of your suspension design. Now go crawl under a stock Jeep and look at the angles. They're actually ideal! That's what I was shooting for.

My links are actually quite short. Even though I'm using short arms...the lower link angles are very mild (nearly flat). The upper link is actually running uphill when the vehicle is at rest...sort of tucked-up high beside the oil pan. So even with 6" of lift over stock...the suspension is sitting relatively low in its range of movement...0% (like a stock Jeep). Essentially, on the H3 you're building your suspension with the 6" of lift already accounted for. This is a huge advantage over a short-arm Jeep where you use up 40% of your suspension just to obtain static lift. That creates all kinds of problems (and the need for longer arms).

On a solid axle H3 things are tad different. Because you're building it from scratch...you don't need to waste a bunch of your "articulation range" just to get lift. You simply build the suspension so it starts its cycle with 6" of lift...at 0% (not 40%). Because of the mild angles...long arms are not really needed. Also...its drives, handles, and reacts like it should. Even the track bar angle is very mild, which means there is almost no bump-steer at all. Its very much a Jeep setup...A STOCK ONE!

Cant believe I missed this, but yea your dead on. I know this will sound somewhat ridiculous but I think its very true. When doing solid axle swaps or suspension mods sometimes it actually helps to use a vehicle that was designed with the opposite intentions of the modifications you are making. Ill start with the rear, I know I know, I ramble on over a stupid simple spring over but I get very excited because its easy and it works, very well might I add. You take a vehicle that is spring over stock, now you want to lift it, you throw on these huge tall arched springs that ride stiff and dont have much downtravel because you started with a stock spring that was flat. Now you take an H3 or a spring under vehicle, you have a nice soft suspension with somewhat flat springs and offer a good amount of downtravel when sprung over. While it required some modifying its totally worth it.

Now talk about the front end, same goes with what CJ was talking about with the 3 link, you are starting flat at 5-6in of lift at 8in of lift (too tall IMO) you have a slight angle but compared to a jeep you can get so much lift and near perfect stock like angles. Again its takes work but I think its worth it, why? you dont have to chase down problems...you build it once the way you want, adjust things and then your good. On my brothers JK hes running a 4.5 in lift to reduce the stock control arm angle he has these drop brackets, does it ride better then before? yea, but you lose clearance, so now when he tackles tougher trails he needs to upgrade to long arm to keep that flat angle, and avoid getting hung up. I drooped out his suspension when installing some coil spacers to compensate for the sagging with the winch and bumper and his trackbar is severely limiting his flex. Why? because he added a truss, mismatched the suspension track bar bracket with the truss trackbar brackets and now he needs to adjust things.

In the end, can I help him make all this work? Yea, but its a constant trace back to what needs adjustments now...so what do you get with a vehicle that has a totally different suspension then you want? Well you make it the way you want, adjust and make everything work the way you want from the beginning, you get a vehicle that is unique not the typical heep. Its a good bit of work but for me I see it being worth it. Others go for the typical jeep because they would rather chase down problems with the ease of kits and aftermarket. Theres no right or wrong way but I personally see it as fun and a way to build your own **** from scratch and make it the way you want.
 

4speedfunk

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,156
Location
Tardville
If you look at a bone stock Jeep 4 link...they really are very well though-out, and they work great right off the show-room floor. The problem is...very few of us even notice or care about a stock Jeep suspension. They sit way too low for big tires, so naturally the first thing most of us want to do is lift it...and that's where the problems start. I tried to stay close to the stock Jeep design...no sense to re-invent the wheel. Jeep has millions and millions of these driving around, and my hats off to them for staying true to the SA design, thru many different owners, recessions, and hard times. I copied the hell out of many Jeeps I saw on the internet...if you study it long enough, it becomes clear what works and what doesn't work when building your own.

The H3 has HUGE wheelwells compared to everything else out there...so that is one hurdle you don't have to deal with (like an XJ or ZJ). Also there are very few choices on where to locate the link mounts. In fact...the only place to attach links to the frame is where I put them, (it made the decision very easy!). The angles and lengths end up being very similar to a stock Jeep rig....I'de call it a "mid-arm", longer than a stock Jeep but not a true "long-arm". It has the same height and clearance as a 6"-lifted Jeep...but the suspension angles of a stock one.

Recon is running similar lengths & angles, although his track-bar and steering are quite different. He's running coil-overs too, so its definitely a high-end rig compared to mine. But, we share the same (nearly identical) link arrangement, and I've seen his rig flexed all over the place...way beyond what I built mine for. This geometry works. I'm currently building a complete H3 3-link on the work bench, and I'll post-up some pics and dimensions when I get it all assembled.
 

Brien W

Member
Messages
8
Location
Fayetteville NC
want to purchase a kit

So you want a solid axle in your H3? Grab a GM Dana 44...grab on of these kits...and start cutting!

These hubs come with ABS rings pre-installed and caliper brackets that allow you to bolt your H3 brakes to the Dana 44 of your choice. The brackets accept stock ABS sensors, and the 12mm studs even allow you to keep your stock rotors and lug-nuts. Don't do a hack-job! Don't settle for 70s-era brakes! Keep your ABS, TCS, and Stabilitrac functioning. I have several sets available in large and small bearing versions. For use with GM/Jeep spindles. $400 (including $50 core for 6-lug hubs).

attachment.php
Please send me the info to purchase a kit. I'm gearing up to do a swap after destroying my weak front diff.
Thanks
 
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